Alaska

TIA Data

2018 Financial State of Alaska (Released 9/24/2019)

Use Create Your Own State Chart to see additional financial, demographic and economic data for this and other states

 
Alaska owns more than it owes.
Alaska's Taxpayer Surplus™ is $74,200, and it received an "A" from TIA.
Alaska is a Sunshine State with enough assets to cover its debt.
Elected officials have created a Taxpayer Surplus™, which is each taxpayer's share of money available after state bills have been paid.
TIA's Taxpayer Surplus™ measurement incorporates both assets and liabilities, not just pension debt.
Alaska has $35.4 billion of assets available to pay the state's bills totaling $15.7 billion.
Alaska has $19.7 billion available after bills have been paid, which breaks down to $74,200 per taxpayer.
Alaska's reported net position is inflated by $588.4 million, largely because the state defers recognizing losses incurred when the net pension liability increases.
The state's financial report was released 234 days after its fiscal year end, which is considered untimely according to the 180 day standard.
 

Prior Years' TIA Data

2017 Financial State of Alaska

2016 Financial State of Alaska

2015 Financial State of Alaska

2014 Financial State of Alaska

2013 Financial State of Alaska

2012 Financial State of Alaska

2011 Financial State of Alaska

2010 Financial State of Alaska

2009 Financial State of Alaska

City and Other Municipal Reports

Financial State of Anchorage

Other Resources

Alaska Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports

Publishing Entity: Department of Administration

IN THE NEWS
State official: Governor open to ‘discussion’ on new taxes

JANUARY 6, 2020 | THE FRONTIERSMAN (ALASKA, CURRENTLY SHOWING 17 DEGREES BELOW ZERO AT WEBSITE) | by Tim Bradner

New state taxes are on table for discussion next spring as the Legislature and Gov. Mike Dunleavy figure out how to deal with a projected $1.5 billion deficit for state Fiscal Year 2021, the budget year that begins next July 1. The Legislature and the governor must approve the budget, including how to cover the funding gap, before June 30.

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